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MONDAY JUNE 3

1400-1500

Industry Workshops I

  • Biotin Interference in Laboratory Assays: The How, Why, and What To Do
  • Early Diagnosis of Sepsis; Novel and Existing Laboratory Testing Used in Diagnosis: A Multidisciplined Approach
  • “Providing the Performance Needed for Safe and Timely Results”, High Sensitivity Troponin I Assays
  • Site Visit to Saint John Regional Hospital (1300-1500)

 

 

TUESDAY JUNE 4

0730-0830

Industry Workshops II

  • Closing the Seronegative Gap in Autoimmune Testing
  • Drugs Screening in Urine Using a Novel Fully Validated LCMS Assay
  • Improvement of Sample Quality and Turn-Around-Times in a Large Hospital Core Chemistry Lab
  • Management of Dysglycemia in Critically Ill Patients – Recent FDA Clearances and Consequences

Biotin Interference in Laboratory Assays: The How, Why, and What To Do
Monday June 3, 1400-1500

AbbottSponsored by Abbott

Patrick Kyle, University of Mississippi, Medical Center

Biotin has become a topic of increasing global interest because of its popular use as a health supplement and therapeutic agent, as well as its interference in select laboratory tests. This interference can lead to falsely increased or decreased results, which can lead to misdiagnosis, mistreatment and increased healthcare costs. With increasing numbers of adverse events related to biotin interference being reported, education to reduce the risks associated with misdiagnosis is critical. This session will review the mechanisms of biotin interference, discuss clinical examples and recommendations for risk mitigation and present data from The AACC Academy’s Guidance Document on Biotin Interference.

Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the mechanisms of biotin interference with laboratory immunoassay tests and the concentrations that may cause interferences.
  • Relate opportunities for education and discuss strategies to ensure the accuracy of laboratory results.
  • Describe recent recommendations from the AACC Academy and how they best apply to your hospital and laboratory.

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Early Diagnosis of Sepsis; Novel and Existing Laboratory Testing Used in Diagnosis: A Multidisciplined Approach
Monday June 3, 1400-1500

Beckman Coulter CanadaSponsored by Beckman Coulter Canada

Thomas Bane, Beckman Coulter

Dan Beriault, St. Michael’s Hospital

Sepsis is a global healthcare crisis, affecting 26 million people worldwide every year and increasing at a rate of 1.5% annually. Sepsis not only significantly affects patients and their loved ones but also places considerable clinical and economic burden on the healthcare system at large. The availability of timely, accurate detection solutions in the ED where treatment can be initiated, is critical to stopping the progression of this life-threatening condition. Patients with less severe sepsis can progress to severe sepsis or septic shock rapidly and up to half of patients with sepsis die. A clear link exists between the timeliness of treatment and mortality.

At the end of the session, participants will gain an understanding of the following:

  • Pathophysiology of sepsis.
  • Economic impact of sepsis care.
  • Diagnostic tests used in sepsis diagnosis and management.
  • Biomarker testing in sepsis; Leukocyte morphometric analysis, Lactate, Procalcitonin, CRP and Immune signaling markers.

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“Providing the Performance Needed for Safe and Timely Results”, High Sensitivity Troponin I Assays
Monday June 3, 1400-1500

Siemens HealthineersSponsored by Siemens Healthineers

Laurent Samson, Siemens Healthineers

Only about one in ten subjects presenting in the emergency department (ED) with chest pain is diagnosed with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is imperative to quickly diagnosis those at highest risk in order to administer life-saving treatments. Faster time to AMI diagnosis with High sensitivity troponin assays will improve patient outcomes, decrease traffic in the ED, and reduce costs.

Cardiac troponin is central to the recent fourth universal definition of myocardial injury and myocardial infarction in the consensus guidelines from the Joint European Society of Cardiology (ESC)/American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA)/World Heart Federation (WHF).

In 2015, the ESC guidelines for the management of NSTEMI patients have proposed new algorithms to interpret HS-Tn assays, with shorter time intervals that we will review but we will also discuss the benefits and caveats for the laboratory and for the clinicians.

In regard to these different possible pathways to interpret high sensitivity troponin assays, Analytical and Clinical performances of the TNIH Siemens Healthineers solutions will be presented:

  • What have we learned from the IV Universal definition of AMI for the interpretation of high sensitivity troponin
  • What are currently the possible pathways to interpret High sensitivity troponin
  • What are the main possible caveats of the faster strategies that Clinicians and Laboratories should know
  • Analytical performances of Siemens TNIH Solution including Atellica IM, Centaur, and Vista/EXL
  • Clinical performances of Atellica TnIH and Centaur TNIH from 3 different cohorts, European (APACE, High-STEACS) American (HIGH-US)

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Site Visit to Saint John Regional Hospital (1300-1500)
Monday June 3, 1300-1500

Roche DiagnosticsSponsored by Roche Diagnostics

In 2016, the Saint John Regional Hospital core laboratory was equipped with new Roche instruments.

Since implementation, Roche Healthcare Consultancy has worked in collaboration with the Saint John scientific and technical team to improve TAT, efficiency and achieve important KPI’s.

Come meet the team and learn about the efficiency gains and improvement seen with the newest generation of automation and analyzers.

Open the invitation pdf

SCHEDULE

Complimentary shuttle service to and from SJRH – please meet at booth #15 &18.

Departure from the Convention Centre is at 12:45 pm.

Capacity is 20 attendees.

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Closing the Seronegative Gap in Autoimmune Testing
Tuesday June 4, 0730-0830

Inter MedicoSponsored by Inter Medico

Ed Bass, Inova Diagnostics

Marvin Fritzler, University of Calgary

New markers hold great potential to improve care of Autoimmune diseases. We will discuss the advent of new markers for Connective Tissue Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Antiphospholipid Syndrome, Myositis and Autoimmune Liver Disease which help close the seronegative gap.

We will also present Aptiva, our new advanced technology for multi-analyte testing in Autoimmunity.

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Educate and inform attendees of the ongoing research in Autoimmune Diseases with a discussion on new markers and technologies that can improve diagnosis and treatment.

Open the invitation pdf

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Drugs Screening in Urine Using a Novel Fully Validated LCMS Assay
Tuesday June 4, 0730-0830

ChromsystemsSponsored by Chromsystems

Huda Cathum, Chromsystems Instruments & Chemicals GmbH

Joseph Macri, Clinical Pathology, Hamilton General Hospital

Matthew Nichols, McMaster University, Molecular Genetics and Pediatric

In our Industrial Workshop, two experts present their experience with a novel fully validated LC-MS/MS assay for the screening and simultaneous quantitation of 108 drugs/metabolites in urine.

Dr. Nichols will present the implementation of the assay on existing LCMS instruments in his laboratory and will compare the data with their presently used immunoassay methods and a GC/MS lab developed test (LDT). Dr. Macri will also discuss the utility of this commercial assay with a focus on workflow and quality of results. Workflow strategies, sample throughput, cost efficiencies and other special considerations will be also discussed.

Our goal is to explain how this new assay for the screening and simultaneous quantitation of 108 drugs/metabolites in urine can help clinical laboratories. Special focus will be placed on why and how a commercial assay can provide superior and reliable results with the ultimate goal of exceptional patient care. Data will be compared with immunoassay and GC-MS-based methods. The performance characteristics are described and the quality and regulatory background will be discussed.

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Improvement of Sample Quality and Turn-Around-Times in a Large Hospital Core Chemistry Lab
Tuesday June 4, 0730-0830

BD CanadaSponsored by BD Canada

Marie Claire Belanger, Centre hospitalier de l’universite de Montreal (CHUM)

Pierre-Olivier Hetu, Centre hospitalier de l’universite de Montreal (CHUM)

In late 2016 BD Canada released a new blood collection tube called Barricor. The novel, mechanical separation technology of this tube has been described to produce a more complete separation of cellular contents from plasma, eliminate gel artifacts, and improve sample stability.

In 2018, Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM) embarked on a LEAN journey to improve the global process quality and turn-around-times in their core chemistry lab. The project included the optimization of existing lab-layout and processes along with switching from serum to clean, gel-free plasma for chemistry testing. The validation of Barricor for chemistry testing included test consolidation, so that total number of tubes drawn could be reduced. This workshop will feature two speakers that will outline implementation of Barricor tubes and learnings from the Lean process.

Topics that will be discussed include: 1) reasons behind choosing to implement the Barricor for multiple analytes; 2) test consolidation; and 3) lessons learned. The workshop will consist of a 5 minute introduction of the speakers, a 40 minute presentation, and a 10 minute question-and-answer period.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe considerations that go into implementing a new blood collection tube for a multiple analytes in a core hospital chemistry lab where out-patient routine and in-patient stat analyses are process on the same line.
  • Describe challenges associated with the implementation of a preanalytical change.
  • Describe the impact of gel-free tubes on overall lab efficiency.

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Management of Dysglycemia in Critically Ill Patients – Recent FDA Clearances and Consequences
Tuesday June 4, 0730-0830

Nova Biomedical Canada Ltd.Sponsored by Nova Biomedical Canada Ltd.

Wei Qui, Nova Biomedical Canada Ltd.

Point-of-Care (POC) glucose testing in the hospital is a valuable tool for the management of in-patient dysglycemia. This can be undermined by inaccurate POC glucose meter results, which are most often caused by interferences related to patients’ pathophysiologic factors and exogenous substances. The presentation will discuss, using peer-reviewed publications and clinical case studies, the risks posed by interferences in glucose meter results, the consequences of using inaccurate meters, evolution of critically ill requirements for glucose meters, and regulatory impact of point-of-care glucose testing in the hospital. In addition, the study design for the FDA clearance of use of one type of hospital blood glucose monitoring system (BGMS) in the critically ill settings will also be described.

At the end of the session participants will be able to:

  • Review FDA historical background for BGMS.
  • Review evolution of StatStrip labelling changes and clearances.
  • Review study design for arterial and venous claim.
  • Review FDA Advisory Panel presentation.
  • Review study design for capillary claim.
  • Review FDA device classifications.
  • Summarize implications for use.